Michigan legislators have recognized the Armenian Genocide on the state and local level. Gubernatorial proclamations as well as state and local legislation are provided below since 1986.  If you know of other documents to be added to this list – old or new – please send a note to elizabeth@anca.org. We look forward to showcasing them.

Michigan citizens also played an active role in assisting Armenian Genocide survivors through the Congressionally mandated Near East Foundation, during the years 1915 – 1930.  Learn more about their efforts below, through research prepared by the ANCA Western Region’s “America We Thank You” program.

And finally, review our snapshot of news coverage of the Armenian Genocide in Michigan press, as we spotlight three articles, prepared as part of the ANCA’s “Genocide Diary” project.  Check back to the Genocide Diary’s Michigan page for new articles added on a monthly basis.

Michigan Gubernatorial Proclamations

Governor Romney Says ‘Heinous Crimes’ of 1915 Emboldened Nazis

April 24, 1967

“More than a half century ago, on April 24, 1915, the government of Turkey ordered the extermination of the entire Armenian Race. In the subsequent massacres that followed the order, more than 1,000,000 Armenian men, women, and children were liquidated, without cause, without mercy, and without the slightest modicum of regard for the appeals of other nations whose entreaties to Turkey to halt the inhuman mass murders fell on deaf ears. Thus, the first modern genocide was recorded in the annals of history.

“The failure of the civilizes world to punish the perpetrators of those heinous crimes emboldened Hitler, just 26 years later to ask, “Who today remembers the Armenian Massacres,” whereupon his Nazi executioners proceeded with the second, more widely known genocide against the Jewish people.

“Armenian-Americans of Greater Detroit join scattered Armenian communities around the world in commemorating the 52nd Anniversary of Armenian Martyrdom in the cause of freedom and justice for all nations.

“Therefore, I, George Romney, Governor of the State of Michigan, do hereby proclaim April 24, 1967, as Armenian Martyr’s Day in Michigan, to commemorate the 52nd Anniversary of the Turkish Massacres of Armenians, and I urge the citizens of Michigan to join with their fellow citizens of Armenian descent, in commemorating this historic event.”

As Printed in the Armenian Weekly, May 4, 1967, page 1

EXECUTIVE DECLARATION BY THE GOVERNOR
MICHIGAN
March 13, 1986

The year 1986 marks the 71st anniversary of the genocide of the Armenian people perpetrated by the government of the Turkish Ottoman Empire in 1915 during World War I. More than 1,500,000 Armenians were massacred or starved and many more were forced to flee from their homeland.

The Armenians are an ancient people, having settled in the vicinity of Mount Ararat in the seventh century B.C. The Armenian Apostolic church was established in the fourth century A.D., making Armenian one of the first Christian nations. Armenians have always believed in the principles of freedom of conscience and religion.

Today, as free people of the United States, Armenians join in the pursuit of liberty, freedom, and peace with other nations. As a community, they have endured to our quality of life in every profession, the arts, religion, and government.

We have learned a lasting lesson from the genocide of the Armenian people, they did not die in vain, but rather serve as a continued source of direction and purpose for all who struggle for humanity and equal rights. The time has come for all people, regardless of color or ethnic origin to exercise a moral conscience by assisting those who need help.

Therefore, I, James J. Blanchard, Governor of the State of Michigan, do hereby declare April 24, 1986, as ARMENIAN MARTYRS DAY in Michigan. I urge all citizens to join with me in a moment of reflection for the Armenian people who lost their lives and to join in a steadfast commitment to work for the peace and harmony of our world for future generations. Given under my hand on this thirteenth day of March in the year Our Lord one thousand nine hundred and eighty-six and of the Commonwealth one hundred fiftieth.

(SIGNED)

Governor James J. Blanchard

Executive Declaration by the Governor
Michigan
April 24, 1995

WHEREAS, at the outbreak of World War I, the Young Turk regime of the Ottoman Empire, led by Talaat Pasha, decided to deport the entire Armenian population of about 1.8 million people to Syria and Mesopotamia, planning to exterminate them by driving all Armenians, regardless of age or condition of health, to the totally barren Der-El-Zor region of what is now Syria; and

WHEREAS, the Armenians were rounded up. brutally driven from their homes and their land, separated from their families, robbed of everything they owned and stripped of possessions they carries with them, and on the death march to Der-El-Zor, more than a million died of starvation or were killed; and

WHEREAS, thousands of Christian Armenians were tortured and murdered for refusing to accept Islam as their religion, and the atrocities inflicted upon them in concentration camps and on death marches to Der-El-Zor resemble those suffered by the victims of the Holocaust in World War II; and

WHEREAS, the massacre of Armenians who escaped deportation and remained in Turkey was called  the “most colossal crime of all ages” by the American examining military mission’s report to the U.S. Congress, and in a telegram sent by U.S. Ambassador Henry Morgenthou to the Secretary of State, Morgenthau warned that “a campaign of race extermination is in progress under a pretext of reprisal against rebellion”; and

WHEREAS, an estimated 1.5 million people of Armenian ancestry perished in the genocide perpetrated by the governments or the Ottoman. Empire from 1915 to 1923; and

WHEREAS, many Armenians emigrated to the United States, where they and their descendants have  contributed much to the economic and cultural vitality of our society, and kept alive the memory of their friends and  relatives who perished during the systematic campaign of extermination; and

NOW THEREFORE, I, John Engler, Governor of the State of Michigan, do hereby declare April 24, 1995 as A DAY OF REMEMBRANCE FOR THE ARMENIAN GENOCIDE OF 1915-1523 in Michigan and urge the citizens of Michigan to observe that day by remembering the 1.5 million people of Armenian ancestry who lost their lives during that terrible time. Given under my hand this thirtieth day of March in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and ninety-five and of the Commonwealth one hundred and fifty-nine.

(SIGNED)

Governor John Engler

STATE OF MICHIGAN

EXECUTIVE OFFICE

LANSING

June 13, 2016

RICK SNYDER                                                                                                                                                                                                                BRIAN CALLEY

GOVERNOR                                                                                                                                                                                                                    LT. GOVERNOR

Michigan House of Representatives

Michigan Senate

State Capitol Building

Lansing, Michigan 48913

 

Ladies and Gentlemen:

Today I signed House Bill 4493 into law but felt further explanation of my position on this matter was warranted.

Our next generation of leaders needs to have the wherewithal to recognize and help prevent widespread harm to their fellow men and women. Teaching the students of Michigan about genocide is important because we should remember and learn about these terrible events in our past while continuing to work toward creating a more tolerant society.

There is, however, a delicate balance we need to be mindful of when we consider requiring that certain subjects be included in our statewide education system. The recommendations of local school boards, teachers, other professional educators and parents need to be considered when developing a curriculum. My signing of HB 4493 should in no way signal any indication that elected state officials are the best guiding voice on what specific material should be taught in the classroom.

Further, there has been much discussion on international policy and the legal definition of genocide as this bill has worked its way through the legislative process. Despite the definition of genocide being defined by the United Nations becoming the norm in international law, not all countries and governments accept it as such. Because of this, there is continued debate as to what historical events should be classified as genocide.

This has been most recently demonstrated by the approval of a resolution by the German parliament on June 2, 2016, declaring the mass killings of Armenians during the years 1915-1920 as genocide. With this resolution, more than 20 countries recognize, in one format or another, this tragedy a genocide. A substantial number of states within the United States also have recognized these events as a genocide.

The legislation I signed today requires instruction on the Holocaust and the Armenian genocide, but is not limited to these two events. There are, unfortunately, other instances, of atrocities that would be beneficial for students to learn about regardless of whether they meet a certain definition. When and how to teach students about these events would be best left to the educational experts trained to do so.

Of course, it is my hope that future generations who would learn about any atrocities would do so only in the context of a history book because they would be living in a more tolerant and cooperative society.

GEORGE W. ROMNEY BUILDING • 111 SOUTH CAPITOL AVENUE • LANSING, MICHIGAN 48909 www.michigan.gov

Thank you for your efforts in this matter and I look forward to continue working with you on promoting a more peaceful and better world.

Sincerely,

(SIGNED)

Rick Snyder

Governor

State Senate Resolutions

1999 Bill Text MI S.R. 44
THE STATE OF MICHIGAN
April 20, 1999

BILL TEXT
STATEMENT

Copyright © 1999 by State Net(R), All Rights Reserved.

1999 MI S.R. 44

MICHIGAN 90TH LEGISLATURE — 1999 REGULAR SESSION SENATE RESOLUTION 44

SENATE RESOLUTION NO. 44

1999 Bill Text MI S.R. 44

VERSION: Adopted

VERSION-DATE: April 20, 1999

SYNOPSIS: A resolution observing the 84the Commemoration of the Armenian Genocide of 1915-1923.

WHEREAS, On April 25, 1999, at St. John’s Armenian Church in Southfield, Michigan, the devoted members and guests will observe the 84th Commemoration of the Armenian Genocide of 1915-1923. It is with heavy hearts that we join with them is recalling this painful chapter in the history of the world and in paying homage to the more than 1,500,000 Armenians whose lives were inhumanely sacrificed and the more than 500,000 Armenians who were forced into exile during this terror. The memory of these victims deserve and, indeed, demand this special observance in their honor; and

WHEREAS, The suffering and sacrifice of the victims of the Armenian Genocide and their descendants must not be forgotten. What began with the arrest and murder of 200 Armenian religious, intellectual, and political leaders in 1915 ended after eight years of genocide. Armenians were brutally rounded up, separated from loved ones, robbed, tortured, humiliated, and forced on one of history’s worst death marches. Those who remained were driven into concentration camps or murdered for not accepting the Islamic faith; and

WHEREAS, The wounds of this atrocity will long continue to scar the memories of survivors of this Genocide and their many descendants. Clearly, all of humanity suffers when such senseless killing is allowed to happen, and all of us must be aware of this evil era so that we will not let it happen again. With more than 35,000 people of Armenian descent living in the Detroit area alone, Michigan will never forget this nightmare of the past; now, therefore, be it

TEXT: Resolved by the Senate, That we observe the 84the Commemoration of the Armenian Genocide of 1915-1923; and be it further

Resolved, That a copy of this document be presented to representatives of the Armenian people as evidence of our respect.

SPONSOR:

Hart

SENATE BILL NO. 395
State of Michigan
May 1, 2001

SB 395, As Passed Senate, May 1, 2001 (Also as passed in the House on April 16, 2002)

SUBSTITUTE FOR

SENATE BILL NO. 395

A bill to establish the Michigan days of remembrance of the Armenian genocide.

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF MICHIGAN ENACT:

Sec. 1. The legislature declares that April 24 of each year shall be the Michigan day of remembrance of the Armenian genocide of 1915-1923, and that the period beginning on the Sunday before that day through the following Sunday shall be the days of remembrance in this state, in memory of the victims of the genocide, and in honor of the survivors.

Senate Resolution No. 34.
State of Michigan
2001

Senators Hart, Koivisto, Byrum, Peters, Cherry, Miller, McManus, Gougeon, McCotter, Jaye, Murphy, DeBeaussaert, North, Stille, Schwarz, Goschka, Leland, Bullard, Bennett and Shugars offered the following resolution:

A resolution observing the 86th Commemoration of the Armenian Genocide of 1915-1923.

WHEREAS, On April 22, 2001, at St. John’s Armenian Church in Southfield, the devoted members and guests will observe the 86th Commemoration of the Armenian Genocide of 1915-1923. It is with heavy hearts that we join with them in recalling this painful chapter in the history of the world and in paying homage to the more than 1,500,000 Armenians whose lives were inhumanely sacrificed and the more than 500,000 Armenians who were forced into exile during this terror. The memory of these victims deserve and, indeed, demand this special observance in their honor; and

WHEREAS, The suffering and sacrifice of the victims of the Armenian Genocide and their descendants must not be forgotten. What began with the arrest and murder of 200 Armenian religious, intellectual, and political leaders in 1915 ended after eight years of genocide. Armenians were brutally rounded up, separated from loved ones, robbed, tortured, humiliated, and forced on one of history’s worst death marches. Those who remained were driven into concentration camps or murdered for not accepting the Islamic faith; and

WHEREAS, The wounds of this atrocity will long continue to scar the memories of survivors of this genocide and their many descendants. Clearly, all of humanity suffers when such senseless killing is allowed to happen, and all of us must be aware of this evil era so that we will not let it happen again. With more than 35,000 people of Armenian descent living in the Detroit area alone, Michigan will never forget this nightmare of the past; now, therefore, be it

RESOLVED by the Senate, That we observe the 86th Commemoration of the Armenian Genocide of 1915-1923; and be it further

RESOLVED, That a copy of this resolution be transmitted to representatives of the Armenian people as evidence of our respect.

Senator Young was named co-sponsor of the resolution.

Senate Resolution No. 40
MICHIGAN
April 23, 2015

Offered by Senators Knollenberg, Kowall, Bieda, Booher, Brandenburg, Colbeck, Green,
Gregory, Hansen, Hertel,  Hildenbrand, Hopgood, Horn, MacGregor, Marleau,
O’Brien, Pavlov, Proos, Robertson, Schuitmaker, Stamas and  Warren

A RESOLUTION MARKING THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF  THE 1915 ARMENIAN GENOCIDE

WHEREAS, On April 24, 1915, the Ottoman Turkish government began a premeditated campaign of ethnic cleansing and genocide against its Christian Armenian minority population, resulting in the death of an estimated  1.5 million Armenians  that continued until  1923; and

WHEREAS, On July 16, 1915, U.S. Ambassador to the Ottoman Empire, Henry Morgenthau, wrote to the U.S. Secretary of State, Robert Lansing, and reported: “Deportation of and excesses against peaceful Armenians is increasing and from harrowing reports of eye witnesses it appears that a campaign of race extermination  is in progress”; and

WHEREAS, On May 28, 1951, the United States government submitted a statement to the Inter­national Criminal Court which stated: “The Roman persecution of the Christians, the Turkish massacres of Armenians, the extermination of millions of Jews and Poles by the Nazis are examples of the crime of genocide”; and

WHEREAS, The U.S. House of Representatives has officially acknowledged the 1915 Armenian Genocide through adopted legislation in 1975 and 1984; and

WHEREAS, On April 22, 1981, President Ronald Reagan issued a proclamation which stated: “Like the genocide of the Armenians before it, and the genocide of the Cambodians which followed it-and like too many other such persecutions of too many other peoples-the lessons of the Holocaust must never be forgotten”; and

WHEREAS, The state of Michigan recognizes the Armenian Genocide and the importance of teaching about it in the state of Michigan. Recognition and reaffirmation of this tragedy educates people about the horrors of man’s inhumanity to man and works to prevent future occurrences of genocides, and;

WHEREAS, We call on the people of the United States and the state of Michigan to observe such day as a day of remembrance for all the victims of genocide, especially those of Armenian ancestry; and

WHEREAS, Armenian Americans contribute richly to Michigan’s social mosaic and add to the political, educational, and economic development of this state; now, therefore, be it

RESOLVED BY THE SENATE, That educators in the state of Michigan are encouraged to teach about human rights, the Armenian Genocide, and the consequences of genocide denial beginning  at the high school level.

Adopted by the Senate, April  23, 2015

(SIGNED)

Secretary of Senate

Michigan House

House Concurrent Resolution No. 640
Michigan
March 27, 1990

by Representative Hoffman, Bartnik, Griffin, Bankes, Barns, Berman, Perry Bullard, Willis Bullard, Clack, DeBeaussaert, DeMArs, Dolan, Dunaskiss, Giese, Gilmer, Gire, Gnodtke, Gubow, Hart, Hillengonds, Hunter, Jacobetti, Knight, Kosteva, Krause, Kulchitsky, Leland,Saunders, Spaniola, Sparks, Stupak, Trim, Varga, and Joe Young Jr. and Senators Arthurhultz, Cropsey, Dingell, Ehlers, Engler, Faxon, Fessler, Geake, Nichols, Schwarz, Shinkle, Vaughn and Welborn

A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION COMMEMORATING APRIL 24, 1990 AS A DAY OF REMEMBRANCE FOR THE ARMENIAN GENOCIDE OF 1915-1923

WHEREAS, During the genocide perpetrated by the governments of the Ottoman Empire, 1.5 million people of Armenian ancestry were victims from 1915 to 1923. At the outbreak of World War I, the Young Turk regime decided to deport the entire Armenian population of about 1.75 million to Syria and Mesopotamia. Talaat Pasha, leader of the Young Turk movement was the principal author of the plan to exterminate the Armenians. The plan of genocide consisted of deporting all Armenians of whatever age or condition of health to the totally barren Der-El-Zor region of what is now Syria; and

WHEREAS, The Armenians were rounded up brutally driven from their homes and their land separates from families, robbed of everything they owned, and stripped of possessions they carried with them. On a death march to Der-El-Zor, more than a million died of starvation or were killed. Thousands of Christian Armenians were tortured and murdered for refusing to accept Islam as their religion. The atrocities inflicted on Armenians in concentration camps and on death marches to Der-El-Zor in the Syrian desert resemble those of the Holocaust of World War II; and

WHEREAS, The massacre of Armenians who escaped deportation and remained in Turkey was called the “most colossal crime of all ages” by the examining American military mission’s secretary of state. Morgenthau warned that “a campaign of race extermination is in progress under a pretext of reprisal against rebellion”; now, therefore, be it

RESOLVED BY THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES (the Senate concurring), That the Michigan Legislature commemorates April 24, 1990, as a day of remembrance of the 75th anniversary of the Armenian genocide of 1915-1923; and be it further

RESOLVED, That the Michigan Legislature calls upon the people of Michigan to observe that day by remembering the 1.5 million people of Armenian ancestry who lost their lives during that terrible time.

Adopted by the House of Representatives. March 27, 1990

Adopted by the Senate. March 38, 1990

1999 Bill Text MI H.R. 74
THE STATE OF MICHIGAN
April 22, 1999

BILL TEXT
STATEMENT

Copyright © 1999 by State Net(R), All Rights Reserved.

1999 MI H.R. 74

MICHIGAN 90TH LEGISLATURE — 1999 REGULAR SESSION HOUSE RESOLUTION 74

HOUSE RESOLUTION NO. 74

1999 Bill Text MI H.R. 74

VERSION: Adopted

VERSION-DATE: April 22, 1999

SYNOPSIS: A resolution observing the 84th Commemoration of the Armenian Genocide of 1915-1923.

WHEREAS, On April 25, 1999, at St. John’s Armenian Church in Southfield, Michigan, the devoted members and guests will observe the 84th Commemoration of the Armenian Genocide of 1915-1923. It is with heavy hearts that we join with them in recalling this painful chapter in the history of the world and in paying homage to the more than 1,5000,000 Armenians whose lives were inhumanely sacrificed and the more than 500,000 Armenians who were forced into exile during this terror. The memory of these victims deserve and, indeed, demand this special observance in their honor; and

WHEREAS, Suffering and sacrifice of the victims of the Armenian Genocide and their descendants must not be forgotten. What began with the arrest and murder of 200 Armenian religious, intellectual, and political leaders in 1915 ended after eight years of genocide. Armenians were brutally rounded up, separated from loved ones, robbed, tortured, humiliated, and forced on one of history’s worst death marches.

Those who remained were driven into concentration camps or murdered for not accepting the Islamic faith; and

WHEREAS, The sounds of this atrocity will long continue to sear the memories of survivors of this genocide and their many descendants. Clearly, all of humanity suffers when such senseless killing is allowed to happen, and all of us must be aware of this evil era so that we will not let it happen again. With more than 35,000 people of Armenian descent living in the Detroit area alone, Michigan will never forget this nightmare of the past; now, therefore, be it

TEXT: Resolved by the House of Representatives, That we observe the 84th Commemoration of the Armenian Genocide of 1915-1923; and be it further

Resolved, That a copy of this document be presented to representatives of the Armenian people as evidence of our respect.

SPONSOR:

Raczkowski

House Resolution No. 58.
State of Michigan
2001

Reps. Shulman, Vander Roest, Dennis, Howell, Raczkowski, Cassis, Richardville, Faunce, Meyer, Gosselin, Voorhees, Toy, Bishop, Hale, Hansen, Ehardt, Julian, Van Woerkom, Kooiman, Sanborn, DeVuyst, Rocca, Woodward, Scranton, Richner, Anderson, Neumann, Garcia, Schauer, McConico, Lipsey, Phillips, Koetje, Jacobs, Thomas, Lemmons, Newell, DeRossett, Woronchak, Birkholz, Jamnick, Waters, Middaugh, Pappageorge, Jelinek, Spade, Vander Veen, Wojno, Frank, Jansen, DeWeese and Plakas offered the following resolution:

House Resolution No. 58.

A resolution designating April 24 of each year as “Michigan Day of Remembrance of the Armenian Genocide of 1915-1923”.

Whereas, One and one-half million men, women, and children of Armenian descent were victims of the brutal genocide perpetrated by the Turkish Ottoman Empire from 1915-1923; and

Whereas, The Armenian genocide and massacres of the Armenian people represented a deliberate attempt to eliminate all traces of a thriving and noble civilization over 3,000 years old. To this day, the Armenian people have not received reparations for their losses; and

Whereas, Revisionists still inexplicably deny the existence of these horrific events. Modern Turkey continues to deny and distort the facts of the Armenian genocide and honors the perpetrators of that crime against humanity as national heroes; and

Whereas, Prior to the invasion of Poland in 1939, Adolf Hitler, the German Nazi dictator, seeking to dispel fears among his military command regarding the world’s response to his genocidal plans, asked “Who, after all, today speaks of the Armenians?”; and

Whereas, Residents of Michigan are highly sensitive to the need for consistently remembering and openly condemning the crimes committed against any culture of people to prevent similar atrocities in the future. Recognition of the 86th anniversary of this genocide is crucial to ensure against the repetition of future genocides and educating people about the atrocities connected to this horrific event; and

Whereas, Armenia is now a free and independent republic, having embraced democracy following nearly 70 years of oppressive Soviet domination; and

Whereas, Armenian-Americans living in Michigan have greatly enriched our state through their leadership in business, agriculture, academia, government, and the arts; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That the members of this legislative body designate April 24 each year as “Michigan Day of Remembrance of the Armenian Genocide of 1915-1923”; and be it further

Resolved, That this legislative body encourages our Michigan public schools to develop programs similar to those already established in California, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York that focus on human rights, with specific attention given to the Armenian Genocide; and be it further

Resolved, That a copy of the resolution be transmitted to the Armenian Assembly of America in Washington, DC.

Act 558 of 2002
State of Michigan
Aug. 28, 2002

ARMENIAN GENOCIDE REMEMBRANCE DAYS

AN ACT to establish the Michigan days of remembrance of the Armenian genocide.

The People of the State of Michigan enact:

435.281 Michigan days of remembrance of the Armenian genocide of 1915-1923.

Sec. 1. The legislature declares that April 24 of each year shall be the Michigan day of remembrance of the Armenian genocide of 1915-1923, and that the period beginning on the Sunday before that day through the following Sunday shall be the days of remembrance in this state, in memory of the victims of the genocide, and in honor of the survivors.

History: 2002, Act 558, Imd. Eff. Aug. 28, 2002.

House Resolution No. 230.
State of Michigan
2004

Reps. Shulman, Accavitti, Adamini, Anderson, Bieda, Brandenburg, Brown, Casperson, Caswell, Daniels, DeRoche, DeRossett, Elkins, Emmons, Farhat, Farrah, Garfield, Gieleghem, Gillard, Gleason, Hager, Huizenga, Jamnick, Koetje, Kolb, Kooiman, Lipsey, Meisner, Meyer, Middaugh, Milosch, Minore, Phillips, Plakas, Richardville, Rivet, Robertson, Rocca, Sak, Shaffer, Spade, Stahl, Stallworth, Tabor, Taub, Tobocman, Vander Veen, Woronchak, Byrum, Dennis, Pappageorge and Voorhees offered the following resolution:

A resolution recognizing April 24, 2004, as “Michigan’s Day of Remembrance of the Armenian Genocide of 1915-1923.”

Whereas, One and one-half million men, women, and children of Armenian descent were victims of the brutal genocide perpetrated by the Turkish Ottoman Empire from 1915-1923; and

Whereas, The Armenian Genocide and massacres of the Armenian people represented a deliberate attempt to eliminate all traces of a thriving noble civilization over 3,000 years old; and

Whereas, The Armenian people have not received reparations for their losses; and Whereas, To this day revisionists still inexplicably deny the existence of these horrific events; and

Whereas, Modern Turkey continues to deny and distort the facts of the Armenian Genocide and honors the perpetrators of that crime against humanity as national heroes; and

Whereas, Prior to the invasion of Poland in 1939, Adolf Hitler, the German Nazi dictator, seeking to dispel fears among his military command regarding the world’s response to his genocidal plans, asked “Who, after all, today speaks of the Armenians?”; and

Whereas, Residents of Michigan are highly sensitive to the need for consistently remembering and openly condemning the crimes committed against any culture of people to prevent similar atrocities in the future; and

Whereas, Recognition of the 89th anniversary of this genocide is crucial to ensuring against the repetition of future genocides and educating people about the atrocities connected to this horrific event; and

Whereas, Armenia is now a free and independent republic, having embraced democracy following nearly 70 years of oppressive Soviet domination; and

Whereas, Armenian-Americans living in Michigan have greatly enriched our state  through their leadership in business, agriculture, academia, government, and the arts; and

Whereas, We join Armenian-Americans and the Armenian community abroad to mourn the loss of so many innocent lives so that the lessons learned contribute to the development of international intervention principles and human rights awareness; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That the members of this legislative body recognize April 24, 2004, as “Michigan Day of Remembrance of the Armenian Genocide of 1915-1923”; and be it further

Resolved, That the Governor in her message commemorating the Armenian Genocide commend this observation to all Michigan residents; and be it further

Resolved, That we encourage Michigan public schools to develop programs similar to those already established in California, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York, that focus on human rights, with specific attention given to the Armenian Genocide; and be it further

Resolved, That copies of this resolution be forwarded to the Department of Legislative Services, the Honorable Governor, Jennifer Granholm, the Honorable Lieutenant Governor, John Cherry, the Honorable Senate Majority Leader, Ken Sikkema, and the Honorable Speaker of the House of Representatives, Rick Johnson.

House Resolution No. 47.
State of Michigan
2005

Reps. Taub, Garfield, Accavitti, Acciavatti, Adamini, Bieda, Byrum, Condino, Dillon, Gillard, Gleason, Gonzales, Gosselin, Green, Hildenbrand, Hopgood, Kooiman, Lemmons, III, Lemmons, Jr., Lipsey, Mayes, McConico, Meyer, Miller, Mortimer, Pavlov, Pearce, Phillips, Polidori, Alma Smith, Stahl, Stakoe, Tobocman, Vagnozzi, Vander Veen, Wojno, Zelenko, Ball, Drolet, Proos and Caul offered the following resolution:

A resolution commemorating April 24, 2005, as Michigan’s Day of Remembrance of the Armenian Genocide of 1915-1923.

Whereas, Each year, on April 24th, all Armenians observe the anniversary of the Turkish crime of genocide that shocked the sensibilities of the civilized world. The Armenians pause on this day to mourn and honor the memory of kinfolk by appropriate religious and civil ceremonies; and

Whereas, April 24th is more than an Armenian day of mourning. The denial of justice is morally affecting all mankind. Therefore, April 24th is a day on which each year the Armenians remind the world community that their problems, with which it has been plagued without surcease, will remain insoluble so long as justice is ignored; and

Whereas, One and one-half million men, women, and children of Armenian descent were victims of the brutal genocide perpetrated by the Turkish Ottoman Empire from 1915-1923. The Armenian Genocide and massacres of the Armenian people represented a deliberate attempt to eliminate all traces of a thriving noble civilization over 3,000 years old. The Armenian people have not received reparations for their losses. To this day revisionists still inexplicably deny the existence of these horrific events; and

Whereas, Prior to the invasion of Poland in 1939, Adolf Hitler, the German Nazi dictator, seeking to dispel fears among his military command regarding the world’s response to his genocidal plans, asked “Who, after all, today speaks of the Armenians?”; and

Whereas, The world must be reminded that this unpunished act of genocide of the Armenians in 1915 in no small measure contributed to the genocide of the Jewish and Polish populations in World War II; and

Whereas, Recognition of the 90th anniversary of this genocide is crucial to ensure against the repetition of future genocides and educate people about the atrocities connected to this horrific event; and

Whereas, The Legislature, through Public Act 558 of 2002, established April 24th as Michigan Day of remembrance of the Armenian genocide. It also declared the period beginning on the Sunday before the 24th through the following Sunday to be the days of remembrance in this state; and

Whereas, Armenia is now a free and independent republic, having embraced democracy following nearly 70 years of oppressive Soviet domination; and

Whereas, Armenian-Americans living in Michigan have greatly enriched our state through their leadership in business, agriculture, academia, government, and the arts; and

Whereas, We join Armenian-Americans and the Armenian community abroad to mourn the loss of so many innocent lives. But, the lessons learned must contribute to the development of international intervention principles and human rights awareness; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That the members of this legislative body commemorate April 24, 2005, as Michigan’s Day of Remembrance of the Armenian Genocide of 1915-1923; and be it further

Resolved, That copies of this resolution be forwarded to the Department of Legislative Services, the Honorable Governor, Jennifer Granholm, the Honorable Lieutenant Governor, John Cherry, the Honorable Senate Majority Leader, Ken Sikkema, and the Honorable Speaker of the House of Representatives, Craig DeRoche.

House Resolution No. 241.
State of Michigan
2006

Reps. Taub, Accavitti, Anderson, Baxter, Bieda, Brown, Byrum, Caul, Cushingberry, Elsenheimer, Farrah, Garfield, Gillard, Gleason, Gosselin, Hildenbrand, Hoogendyk, Hopgood, Huizenga, Jones, Kahn, Kolb, Kooiman, LaJoy, David Law, Lemmons, III, Lipsey, Marleau, Meisner, Meyer, Miller, Murphy, Nitz, Nofs, Palmer, Pastor, Pearce, Polidori, Proos, Shaffer, Sheltrown, Alma Smith, Spade, Stahl, Tobocman, Vagnozzi, Vander Veen and Waters offered the following resolution:

A resolution commemorating April 24, 2006, as Michigan’s Day of Remembrance of the Armenian Genocide of 1915-1923.

Whereas, Each year, on April 24th, all Armenians observe the anniversary of the Turkish crime of genocide that shocked the sensibilities of the civilized world. The Armenians pause on this day to mourn and honor the memory of kinfolk by appropriate religious and civil ceremonies; and

Whereas, April 24th is more than an Armenian day of mourning. The denial of justice is morally affecting all mankind. Therefore, April 24th is a day on which each year the Armenians remind the world community that their problems, with which it has been plagued without surcease, will remain insoluble so long as justice is ignored; and

Whereas, One and one-half million men, women, and children of Armenian descent were victims of the brutal genocide perpetrated by the Turkish Ottoman Empire from 1915-1923. The Armenian Genocide and massacres of the Armenian people represented a deliberate attempt to eliminate all traces of a thriving noble civilization over 3,000-years-old. The Armenian people have not received reparations for their losses. To this day revisionists still inexplicably deny the existence of these horrific events; and

Whereas, Prior to the invasion of Poland in 1939, Adolf Hitler, the German Nazi dictator, seeking to dispel fears among his military command regarding the world’s response to his genocidal plans, asked “Who, after all, today speaks of the Armenians?”; and

Whereas, The world must be reminded that this unpunished act of genocide of the Armenians in 1915 in no small measure contributed to the genocide of the Jewish and Polish populations in World War I; and

Whereas, Recognition of the 90th anniversary of this genocide is crucial to ensure against the repetition of future genocides and educate people about the atrocities connected to this horrific event; and

Whereas, The Legislature, through Public Act 558 of 2002, established April 24th as Michigan Day of remembrance of the Armenian genocide. It also declared the period beginning on the Sunday before the 24th through the following Sunday to be the days of remembrance in this state; and

Whereas, Armenia is now a free and independent republic, having embraced democracy following nearly 70 years of oppressive Soviet domination; and

Whereas, Armenian-Americans living in Michigan have greatly enriched our state through their leadership in business, agriculture, academia, government, and the arts; and

Whereas, We join Armenian-Americans and the Armenian community abroad to mourn the loss of so many innocent lives. But, the lessons learned must contribute to the development of international intervention principles and human rights awareness; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That the members of this legislative body commemorate April 24, 2006, as Michigan’s Day of Remembrance of the Armenian Genocide of 1915-1923; and be it further

Resolved, That copies of this resolution be forwarded to the Honorable Governor, Jennifer Granholm, the Honorable Lieutenant Governor, John Cherry, the Honorable Senate Majority Leader, Ken Sikkema, and the Honorable Speaker of the House of Representatives, Craig DeRoche.

HOUSE RESOLUTION NO. 48.
State of Michigan
March 15, 2007

MICHIGAN 94TH LEGISLATURE — FIRST REGULAR SESSION HOUSE RESOLUTION 48

REP. MILLER OFFERED THE FOLLOWING RESOLUTION: HOUSE RESOLUTION NO. 48.

VERSION: Adopted

VERSION-DATE: March 15, 2007

SYNOPSIS: A resolution commemorating April 24, 2007, as Michigan’s Day of Remembrance of the Armenian Genocide of 1915-1923.

Whereas, Each year, on April 24th, all Armenians observe the anniversary of the Turkish crime of genocide that shocked the sensibilities of the civilized world. The Armenians pause on this day to mourn and honor the memory of kinfolk by appropriate religious and civil ceremonies; and

Whereas, April 24th is more than an Armenian day of mourning. The denial of justice is morally affecting all mankind. Therefore, April 24th is a day on which each year the Armenians remind the world that their problems, with which it has been plagued without end, will remain insoluble so long as justice is ignore; and

Whereas, One and one-half million men, women, and children of Armenian descent were victims of the brutal genocide perpetrated by the Turkish Ottoman Empire from 1915-1923. The Armenian Genocide and massacres of the Armenian people represented a deliberate attempt to eliminate all traces of a thriving noble civilization over 3,000 years-old. The Armenian people have not received reparations for their losses. To this day revisionists still inexplicably deny the existence of these horrific events; and

Whereas, Prior to the invasion of Poland in 1939, Adolf Hitler, the German Nazi dictator, seeking to dispel fears among his military command regarding the world’s response to his genocidal plans, asked “Who, after all, today speaks of the Armenians?”; and

Whereas, The world must be reminded that this unpunished act of genocide of the Armenians in 1915 in no small measure contributed to the genocide of the Jewish and Polish populations in World War II; and

Whereas, Recognition of the anniversary of this genocide is crucial to ensure against the repetition of future genocides and educate people about the atrocities connected to this horrific event; and

Whereas, The Legislature, through Public Act 558 of 2002, established April 24th as Michigan Day of remembrance of the Armenian Genocide. It also declared the period beginning on the Sunday before the 24th through the following Sunday to be the days of remembrance in this state; and

Whereas, Armenia is now a free and independent republic, having embraced democracy following nearly 70 years of oppressive Soviet domination; and

Whereas, Armenian-Americans living in Michigan have greatly enriched our state through their leadership in business, agriculture, academia, government, and the arts; and

Whereas, We join Armenian-Americans and the Armenian community abroad to mourn the loss of so many innocent lives. But, the lessons learned must contribute to the development of international intervention principles and human rights awareness; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That the members of this legislative body commemorate April 24, 2007, as Michigan’s Day of Remembrance of the Armenian Genocide of 1915-1923; and be it further

Resolved, That copies of this resolution be forwarded to the Honorable Governor, Jennifer Granholm, the Honorable Lieutenant Governor, John D. Cherry, the Honorable Senate Majority Leader, Michael D. Bishop, and the Honorable Speaker of the House of Representatives, Andy Dillon.

Substitute for House Resolution No. 61.
Michigan
2015

A resolution to declare April 24, 2015, as a Day of Remembrance in the state of Michigan for the Armenian Genocide of 1915-1923.

Whereas, Michigan Armenian Churches have been involved in numerous charity and community drives across the state, including, but not limited to, providing college scholarships for deserving students, and serving Armenian refugee communities across the state; and

Whereas, Between 1915 and 1923, Armenians were subject to torture, starvation, mass murder and exile from their historic homeland. Over 1.5 million Armenians lost their lives. The bulk of the Armenian population that was displaced from their homes was forced to escape to neighboring and far away communities. Many refugees fled to the United States. Today, Michigan is honored to be home to a vibrant Armenian-American population. This thriving community is a proud reminder of survival and determination even in the face of extreme injustices. The Armenian Genocide represented a deliberate attempt by the Ottoman Empire to eliminate all traces of a thriving, noble civilization; and

Whereas, Armenians communities all over the world commemorate this tragedy on  April 24.  On this day, we honor the victims and survivors of the genocide and reaffirm our commitment to preventing future atrocities from being committed against any people; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That the members of this legislative body declare April 24, 2015, as a Day of Remembrance in the state of Michigan for the Armenian Genocide of 1915-1923.

House Resolution No. 272.
The state of Michigan
2016

Reps. Kesto, Howrylak, Cochran, Crawford, Heise, Hooker and Webber offered the following resolution:

A resolution to declare April 24, 2016, as a Day of Remembrance in the state of Michigan for the Armenian Genocide of 1915-1923.

WHEREAS, Michigan Armenian churches have been involved in numerous charity and community drives across the state, including, but not limited to, providing college scholarships for deserving students and serving Armenian refugee communities across the state; and

WHEREAS, Between 1915-1923, Armenians were subject to torture, starvation, mass murder, and exile from their historic homeland. Over 1.5 million Armenians lost their lives. The bulk of the Armenian population was displaced from their homes and forced to escape to neighboring and far away communities. Many refugees fled to the United States. Today, Michigan is honored to be home to a vibrant Armenian-American population. This thriving community is a proud reminder of the survival and determination even in the face of extreme injustices.  The Armenian Genocide represented a deliberate attempt by the Ottoman Empire to eliminate all traces of a thriving, noble civilization; and

WHEREAS, Armenian communities all over the world commemorate this tragedy on April 24. On this day, we honor the victims and survivors of the genocide and reaffirm our commitment to preventing future atrocities from being committed against any people; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That the members of this legislative body declare April 24, 2016, as a Day of Remembrance in the state of Michigan for the Armenian Genocide of 1915-1923.

98TH LEGISLATURE
STATE OF MICHIGAN
2016

Introduced by Reps. Kesto, Schor, Moss, Wittenberg, Callton, McCready, Greig, Howrylak, Gay-Dagnogo, Pagan, LaFontaine, Hooker, Pscholka, Muxlow, Clemente, Graves, Afendoulis, Banks, Brinks, Brunner, Byrd, Canfield, Chang, Chatfield, Chirkun, Cochran, Cole, Cox, Crawford, Darany, Dianda, Driskell, Durhal, Faris, Forlini, Garcia, Garrett, Geiss, Glenn, Goike, Greimel, Heise, Hoadley, Hovey-Wright, Hughes, Iden, Jacobsen, Jenkins, Kelly, Kivela, Kosowski, Lane, Lauwers, LaVoy, Leutheuser, Liberati, Love, Lyons, Maturen, Nesbitt, Pettalia, Phelps, Plawecki, Price, Rendon, Brett Roberts, Sarah Roberts, Rutledge, Santana, Sheppard, Singh, Smiley, Somerville, Talabi, Tedder, Theis, Townsend, Vaupel, VerHeulen, Victory, Webber, Yanez, Yonker and Zemke

ENROLLED HOUSE BILL No. 4493

AN ACT to amend 1976 PA 451, entitled “An act to provide a system of public instruction and elementary and secondary schools; to revise, consolidate, and clarify the laws relating to elementary and secondary education; to provide for the organization, regulation, and maintenance of schools, school districts, public school academies, intermediate school districts, and other public school entities; to prescribe rights, powers, duties, and privileges of schools, school districts, public school academies, intermediate school districts, and other public school entities; to provide for the regulation of school teachers and certain other school employees; to provide for school elections and to prescribe powers and duties with respect thereto; to provide for the levy and collection of taxes; to provide for the borrowing of money and issuance of bonds and other evidences of indebtedness; to establish a fund and provide for expenditures from that fund; to provide for and prescribe the powers and duties of certain state departments, the state
board of education, and certain other boards and officials; to provide for licensure of boarding schools; to prescribe penalties; and to repeal acts and parts of acts,” by amending sections 1249, 1278, and 1279g (MCL 380.1249, 380.1278, and 380.1279g), section 1249 as amended by 2015 PA 173, section 1278 as amended by 2004 PA 596, and section 1279g as amended by 2008 PA 349, and by adding section 1168.

The People of the State of Michigan enact:

Sec. 1168.

(1) Beginning in the 2016-2017 school year, the board of a school district or board of directors of a public school academy shall ensure that the school district’s or public school academy’s social studies curriculum for grades 8 to 12 includes age- and grade-appropriate instruction about genocide, including, but not limited to, the Holocaust and the Armenian Genocide. The legislature recommends a combined total of 6 hours of this instruction during grades 8 to 12.
(2) Subsection (1) does not preclude a school district or public school academy from including instruction described in subsection (1) in other subject areas.
(3) The governor’s council on genocide and Holocaust education is created as a temporary commission described in section 4 of article V of the state constitution of 1963.
(4) The governor’s council on genocide and Holocaust education shall consist of 15 members appointed by the governor. Members shall be individuals who have a particular interest or expertise in genocide education or Holocaust education, or both.
(5) If the governor determines that sufficient private funding is available for the operations of the governor’s council on genocide and Holocaust education, the governor shall appoint the members of the governor’s council on genocide and Holocaust education within 60 days after the effective date of this section.
(6) If a vacancy occurs on the governor’s council on genocide and Holocaust education, the governor shall make an appointment for the unexpired term in the same manner as the original appointment.
(7) The governor may remove a member of the governor’s council on genocide and Holocaust education for incompetence, dereliction of duty, malfeasance, misfeasance, or nonfeasance in office, or any other good cause.
(8) The first meeting of the governor’s council on genocide and Holocaust education shall be called by the governor. At the first meeting, the governor’s council on genocide and Holocaust education shall elect from among its members a chairperson and other officers as it considers necessary or appropriate. After the first meeting, the governor’s council on genocide and Holocaust education shall meet at least quarterly, or more frequently at the call of the chairperson or if requested by 8 or more members.
(9) A majority of the members of the governor’s council on genocide and Holocaust education appointed and serving constitute a quorum for the transaction of business at a meeting of the council. A majority of the members present and serving are required for official action of the council. A member may not vote by proxy.
(10) The business that the governor’s council on genocide and Holocaust education may perform shall be conducted at a public meeting of the council held in compliance with the open meetings act, 1976 PA 267, MCL 15.261 to 15.275.
(11) A writing prepared, owned, used, in the possession of, or retained by the governor’s council on genocide and Holocaust education in the performance of an official function is subject to the freedom of information act, 1976 PA 442, MCL 15.231 to 15.246.
(12) Members of the governor’s council on genocide and Holocaust education shall serve without compensation. However, if funding is available for this purpose from private sources, members of the council may be reimbursed for their actual and necessary expenses incurred in the performance of their official duties as members of the council.
(13) State funds shall not be used for the operations of the governor’s council on genocide and Holocaust education.
(14) The governor’s council on genocide and Holocaust education shall do all of the following:
(a) Identify, to the extent possible, all sources of strategies and content for providing and enhancing genocide education to students.
(b) Advise the superintendent of public instruction, school districts, public school academies, and nonpublic schools in this state on strategies and content for providing and enhancing genocide education to students.
(c) Identify, to the extent possible, all programs and resources to train teachers in providing genocide education to students and share these programs and resources with the superintendent of public instruction, school districts, public school academies, and nonpublic schools in this state.
(d) Promote, within the schools and general population of this state, implementation of genocide education. This duty includes, but is not limited to, all of the following:
(i) In accordance with 2004 PA 10, engendering and coordinating events, activities, and education that will appropriately memorialize the victims of the Holocaust, such as observance of Holocaust Remembrance Day and the Days of Remembrance.
(ii) In accordance with 2002 PA 558, engendering and coordinating events, activities, and education that will appropriately memorialize the victims of the Armenian Genocide, such as observance of the Michigan Days of Remembrance of the Armenian Genocide.
(iii) Engendering and coordinating events, activities, and education that will appropriately memorialize the victims of other genocides.
(e) Secure private funding for the governor’s council on genocide and Holocaust education. The governor’s council on genocide and Holocaust education may also apply for and accept grants and receive gifts, donations, and other financial support from private sources, in accordance with state law, for the purpose of carrying out its duties under this section.
(f) Carry out any other tasks that it considers to be advisable to support the ability of this state to meet its goals in providing genocide education.
(g) Submit an annual report to the legislature on the progress and status of the council.
(15) With respect to its duties, the governor’s council on genocide and Holocaust education is an advisory body only. There is no right or obligation on the part of this state or its subdivisions, officials, or employees to implement the findings or recommendations of the governor’s council on genocide and Holocaust education unless further legislation is enacted that specifically authorizes implementation of those findings or recommendations.
(16) As used in this section:
(a) “Armenian Genocide” means the systematic, bureaucratic, state-sponsored persecution and murder of approximately 1,500,000 Armenians by the Ottoman Turkish Empire and its collaborators.
(b) “Genocide” means any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial, or religious group, as such: killing members of the group; causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group; deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part; imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group; or forcibly transferring children of the group to another group.
(c) “Holocaust” means the systematic, bureaucratic, state-sponsored persecution and murder of approximately 6,000,000 Jews and 5,000,000 other individuals by the Nazi regime and its collaborators.

Sec. 1249. (1) Subject to subsection (4), with the involvement of teachers and school administrators, the board of a school district or intermediate school district or board of directors of a public school academy shall adopt and implement for all teachers and school administrators a rigorous, transparent, and fair performance evaluation system that does all of the following:
(a) Evaluates the teacher’s or school administrator’s job performance at least annually while providing timely and constructive feedback.
(b) Establishes clear approaches to measuring student growth and provides teachers and school administrators with relevant data on student growth.
(c) Evaluates a teacher’s or school administrator’s job performance, using multiple rating categories that take into account student growth and assessment data. Student growth must be measured using multiple measures that may include student learning objectives, achievement of individualized education program goals, nationally normed or locally developed assessments that are aligned to state standards, research-based growth measures, or alternative assessments
that are rigorous and comparable across schools within the school district, intermediate school district, or public school academy. If the performance evaluation system implemented by a school district, intermediate school district, or public school academy under this section does not already include the rating of teachers as highly effective, effective, minimally effective, and ineffective, then the school district, intermediate school district, or public school academy shall revise the performance evaluation system not later than September 19, 2011 to ensure that it rates teachers as highly effective,
effective, minimally effective, or ineffective.
(d) Uses the evaluations, at a minimum, to inform decisions regarding all of the following:
(i) The effectiveness of teachers and school administrators, ensuring that they are given ample opportunities for improvement.
(ii) Promotion, retention, and development of teachers and school administrators, including providing relevant coaching, instruction support, or professional development.
(iii) Whether to grant tenure or full certification, or both, to teachers and school administrators using rigorous standards and streamlined, transparent, and fair procedures.
(iv) Removing ineffective tenured and untenured teachers and school administrators after they have had ample opportunities to improve, and ensuring that these decisions are made using rigorous standards and streamlined, transparent, and fair procedures.
(2) The board of a school district or intermediate school district or board of directors of a public school academy shall ensure that the performance evaluation system for teachers meets all of the following:
(a) The performance evaluation system shall include at least an annual year-end evaluation for all teachers. Beginning with the 2015-2016 school year, an annual year-end evaluation shall meet all of the following:
(i) For the 2015-2016, 2016-2017, and 2017-2018 school years, 25% of the annual year-end evaluation shall be based on student growth and assessment data. Beginning with the 2018-2019 school year, 40% of the annual year-end evaluation shall be based on student growth and assessment data.
(ii) Beginning with the 2018-2019 school year, for core content areas in grades and subjects in which state assessments are administered, 50% of student growth must be measured using the state assessments, and the portion of student growth not measured using state assessments must be measured using multiple research-based growth measures or alternative assessments that are rigorous and comparable across schools within the school district, intermediate school
district, or public school academy. Student growth also may be measured by student learning objectives or nationally normed or locally adopted assessments that are aligned to state standards, or based on achievement of individualized education program goals.
(iii) Beginning with the 2016-2017 school year, the portion of a teacher’s annual year-end evaluation that is not based on student growth and assessment data, as described under subparagraph (i), shall be based primarily on a teacher’s performance as measured by the evaluation tool developed or adopted by the school district, intermediate school district, or public school academy under subdivision (f).
(iv) The portion of a teacher’s evaluation that is not measured using student growth and assessment data, as described under subparagraph (i), or using the evaluation tool developed or adopted by the school district, intermediate school district, or public school academy, as described under subparagraph (iii), shall incorporate criteria enumerated in section 1248(1)(b)(i) to (iii) that are not otherwise evaluated under subparagraph (i) or (iii).
(b) If there are student growth and assessment data available for a teacher for at least 3 school years, the annual year-end evaluation shall be based on the student growth and assessment data for the most recent 3-consecutive-schoolyear period. If there are not student growth and assessment data available for a teacher for at least 3 school years, the annual year-end evaluation shall be based on all student growth and assessment data that are available for the teacher.
(c) The annual year-end evaluation shall include specific performance goals that will assist in improving effectiveness for the next school year and are developed by the school administrator or his or her designee conducting the evaluation, in consultation with the teacher, and any recommended training identified by the school administrator or designee, in consultation with the teacher, that would assist the teacher in meeting these goals. For a teacher described in subdivision
(d), the school administrator or designee shall develop, in consultation with the teacher, an individualized development plan that includes these goals and training and is designed to assist the teacher to improve his or her effectiveness.
(d) The performance evaluation system shall include a midyear progress report for a teacher who is in the first year of the probationary period prescribed by section 1 of article II of 1937 (Ex Sess) PA 4, MCL 38.81, or who received a rating of minimally effective or ineffective in his or her most recent annual year-end evaluation. The midyear progress report shall be used as a supplemental tool to gauge a teacher’s improvement from the preceding school year and to assist a teacher to improve. All of the following apply to the midyear progress report:
(i) The midyear progress report shall be based at least in part on student achievement.
(ii) The midyear progress report shall be aligned with the teacher’s individualized development plan under subdivision (c).
(iii) The midyear progress report shall include specific performance goals for the remainder of the school year that are developed by the school administrator conducting the annual year-end evaluation or his or her designee and any recommended training identified by the school administrator or designee that would assist the teacher in meeting these goals. At the midyear progress report, the school administrator or designee shall develop, in consultation with the teacher, a written improvement plan that includes these goals and training and is designed to assist the teacher to
improve his or her rating.
(iv) The midyear progress report shall not take the place of an annual year-end evaluation.

(e) The performance evaluation system shall include classroom observations to assist in the performance evaluations. All of the following apply to these classroom observations:
(i) A classroom observation shall include a review of the teacher’s lesson plan and the state curriculum standard being used in the lesson and a review of pupil engagement in the lesson.
(ii) A classroom observation does not have to be for an entire class period.
(iii) Unless a teacher has received a rating of effective or highly effective on his or her 2 most recent annual year-end evaluations, there shall be at least 2 classroom observations of the teacher each school year. Beginning with the 2016-2017 school year, at least 1 observation must be unscheduled.
(iv) Beginning with the 2016-2017 school year, the school administrator responsible for the teacher’s performance evaluation shall conduct at least 1 of the observations. Other observations may be conducted by other observers who are trained in the use of the evaluation tool that is used under subdivision (f). These other observers may be teacher leaders.
(v) Beginning with the 2016-2017 school year, a school district, intermediate school district, or public school academy shall ensure that, within 30 days after each observation, the teacher is provided with feedback from the observation.
(f) For the purposes of conducting annual year-end evaluations under the performance evaluation system, by the beginning of the 2016-2017 school year, the school district, intermediate school district, or public school academy shall adopt and implement 1 or more of the evaluation tools for teachers that are included on the list under subsection (5).

However, if a school district, intermediate school district, or public school academy has 1 or more local evaluation tools for teachers or modifications of an evaluation tool on the list under subsection (5), and the school district, intermediate school district, or public school academy complies with subsection (3), the school district, intermediate school district, or public school academy may conduct annual year-end evaluations for teachers using 1 or more local evaluation tools or modifications. The evaluation tools shall be used consistently among the schools operated by a school district, intermediate
school district, or public school academy so that all similarly situated teachers are evaluated using the same evaluation tool.

(g) The performance evaluation system shall assign an effectiveness rating to each teacher of highly effective, effective, minimally effective, or ineffective, based on his or her score on the annual year-end evaluation described in this subsection.
(h) As part of the performance evaluation system, and in addition to the requirements of section 1526, a school district, intermediate school district, or public school academy is encouraged to assign a mentor or coach to each teacher who is described in subdivision (d).
(i) The performance evaluation system may allow for exemption of student growth data for a particular pupil for a school year upon the recommendation of the school administrator conducting the annual year-end evaluation or his or her designee and approval of the school district superintendent or his or her designee, intermediate superintendent or his or her designee, or chief administrator of the public school academy, as applicable.
(j) The performance evaluation system shall provide that, if a teacher is rated as ineffective on 3 consecutive annual year-end evaluations, the school district, public school academy, or intermediate school district shall dismiss the teacher from his or her employment. This subdivision does not affect the ability of a school district, intermediate school district, or public school academy to dismiss a teacher from his or her employment regardless of whether the teacher is rated as ineffective on 3 consecutive annual year-end evaluations.
(k) The performance evaluation system shall provide that, if a teacher is rated as highly effective on 3 consecutive annual year-end evaluations, the school district, intermediate school district, or public school academy may choose to conduct a year-end evaluation biennially instead of annually. However, if a teacher is not rated as highly effective on 1 of these biennial year-end evaluations, the teacher shall again be provided with annual year-end evaluations.
(l) The performance evaluation system shall provide that, if a teacher who is not in a probationary period prescribed by section 1 of article II of 1937 (Ex Sess) PA 4, MCL 38.81, is rated as ineffective on an annual year-end evaluation, the teacher may request a review of the evaluation and the rating by the school district superintendent, intermediate superintendent, or chief administrator of the public school academy, as applicable. The request for a review must be submitted in writing within 20 days after the teacher is informed of the rating. Upon receipt of the request, the school
district superintendent, intermediate superintendent, or chief administrator of the public school academy, as applicable, shall review the evaluation and rating and may make any modifications as appropriate based on his or her review.
However, the performance evaluation system shall not allow for a review as described in this subdivision more than twice in a 3-school-year period.
(m) Beginning with the 2016-2017 school year, the school district, intermediate school district, or public school academy shall provide training to teachers on the evaluation tool or tools used by the school district, intermediate school district, or public school academy in its performance evaluation system and on how each evaluation tool is used. This training may be provided by a school district, intermediate school district, or public school academy, or by a consortium consisting of 2 or more of these.
(n) Beginning with the 2016-2017 school year, a school district, intermediate school district, or public school academy shall ensure that training is provided to all evaluators and observers. The training shall be provided by an individual who has expertise in the evaluation tool or tools used by the school district, intermediate school district, or public school academy, which may include either a consultant on that evaluation tool or framework or an individual who has been trained to train others in the use of the evaluation tool or tools. This subdivision does not prohibit a school district,
intermediate school district, public school academy, or consortium consisting of 2 or more of these, from providing the training in the use of the evaluation tool or tools if the trainer has expertise in the evaluation tool or tools.

(3) Beginning with the 2016-2017 school year, a school district, intermediate school district, or public school academy shall post on its public website all of the following information about the evaluation tool or tools it uses for its performance evaluation system for teachers:
(a) The research base for the evaluation framework, instrument, and process or, if the school district, intermediate school district, or public school academy adapts or modifies an evaluation tool from the list under subsection (5), the research base for the listed evaluation tool and an assurance that the adaptations or modifications do not compromise the validity of that research base.
(b) The identity and qualifications of the author or authors or, if the school district, intermediate school district, or public school academy adapts or modifies an evaluation tool from the list under subsection (5), the identity and qualifications of a person with expertise in teacher evaluations who has reviewed the adapted or modified evaluation tool.
(c) Either evidence of reliability, validity, and efficacy or a plan for developing that evidence or, if the school district, intermediate school district, or public school academy adapts or modifies an evaluation tool from the list under subsection (5), an assurance that the adaptations or modifications do not compromise the reliability, validity, or efficacy of the evaluation tool or the evaluation process.
(d) The evaluation frameworks and rubrics with detailed descriptors for each performance level on key summative indicators.
(e) A description of the processes for conducting classroom observations, collecting evidence, conducting evaluation conferences, developing performance ratings, and developing performance improvement plans.
(f) A description of the plan for providing evaluators and observers with training.
(4) If a collective bargaining agreement was in effect for teachers or school administrators of a school district, public school academy, or intermediate school district as of July 19, 2011, if that same collective bargaining agreement is still in effect as of November 5, 2015, and if that collective bargaining agreement prevents compliance with subsection (1), then subsection (1) does not apply to that school district, public school academy, or intermediate school district until after the expiration of that collective bargaining agreement.
(5) The department shall establish and maintain a list of teacher evaluation tools that have demonstrated evidence of efficacy and that may be used for the purposes of this section. That list initially shall include at least the evaluation models recommended in the final recommendations released by the Michigan council on educator effectiveness in July 2013. The list shall include a statement indicating that school districts, intermediate school districts, and public school academies are not limited to only using the evaluation tools that are included on the list. A school district, intermediate
school district, or public school academy is not required to use an evaluation tool for teacher evaluations that is the same as it uses for school administrator evaluations or that has the same author or authors as the evaluation tool it uses for school administrator evaluations. The department shall promulgate rules establishing standards and procedures for adding an evaluation tool to or removing an evaluation tool from the list. These rules shall include a process for a school district, intermediate school district, or public school academy to submit its own evaluation tool for review for placement on the list.
(6) The training required under subsection (2) shall be paid for from the funds available in the educator evaluation reserve fund created under section 95a of the state school aid act, MCL 388.1695a.
(7) This section does not affect the operation or applicability of section 1248.
(8) As used in this section, “teacher” means an individual who has a valid Michigan teaching certificate or authorization; who is employed, or contracted for, by a school district, intermediate school district, or public school academy; and who is assigned by the school district, intermediate school district, or public school academy to deliver direct instruction to pupils in any of grades K to 12 as a teacher of record.

Sec. 1278.

(1) In addition to the requirements for accreditation under section 1280 specified in that section, if the board of a school district wants all of the schools of the school district to be accredited under section 1280, the board shall provide to all pupils attending public school in the district a core academic curriculum in compliance with subsection (3) in each of the curricular areas specified in the state board recommended model core academic curriculum content standards developed under subsection (2). The state board model core academic curriculum content standards shall encompass academic and cognitive instruction only. For purposes of this section, the state board model core academic curriculum content standards shall not include attitudes, beliefs, or value systems that are not essential in the legal, economic, and social structure of our society and to the personal and social responsibility of citizens of our society.
(2) Recommended model core academic curriculum content standards shall be developed and periodically updated by the state board, shall be in the form of knowledge and skill content standards that are recommended as state standards for adoption by public schools in local curriculum formulation and adoption, and shall be distributed to each school district in the state. The recommended model core academic curriculum content standards shall set forth desired
learning objectives in math, science, reading, history, geography, economics, American government, and writing for all children at each stage of schooling and be based upon the “Michigan K-12 Program Standards of Quality” to ensure that high academic standards, academic skills, and academic subject matters are built into the instructional goals of all school districts for all children. The state board shall ensure that the recommended model core academic curriculum content standards for history for grades 8 to 12 include learning objectives concerning genocide, including, but not limited to, the Holocaust and the Armenian Genocide. The state board also shall ensure that the state assessment program and the Michigan merit examination are based on the state recommended model core curriculum content standards, are testing only for proficiency in basic and advanced academic skills and academic subject matter, and are not used to measure pupils’ values or attitudes.
(3) The board of each school district, considering academic curricular objectives defined and recommended pursuant to subsection (2), shall do both of the following:
(a) Establish a core academic curriculum for its pupils at the elementary, middle, and secondary school levels. The core academic curriculum shall define academic objectives to be achieved by all pupils and shall be based upon the school district’s educational mission, long-range pupil goals, and pupil performance objectives. The core academic curriculum may vary from the model core academic curriculum content standards recommended by the state board pursuant to subsection (2).
(b) After consulting with teachers and school building administrators, determine the aligned instructional program for delivering the core academic curriculum and identify the courses and programs in which the core academic curriculum will be taught.
(4) The board may supplement the core academic curriculum by providing instruction through additional classes and programs.
(5) For all pupils, the subjects or courses, and the delivery of those including special assistance, that constitute the curriculum the pupils engage in shall assure the pupils have a realistic opportunity to learn all subjects and courses required by the district’s core academic curriculum. A subject or course required by the core academic curriculum pursuant to subsection (3) shall be provided to all pupils in the school district by a school district, a consortium of school districts, or a consortium of 1 or more school districts and 1 or more intermediate school districts.
(6) To the extent practicable, the state board may adopt or develop academic objective-oriented high standards for knowledge and life skills, and a recommended core academic curriculum, for special education pupils for whom it may not be realistic or desirable to expect achievement of initial mastery of the state board recommended model core academic content standards objectives or of a high school diploma.
(7) The state board shall make available to all nonpublic schools in this state, as a resource for their consideration, the model core academic curriculum content standards developed for public schools pursuant to subsection (2) for the purpose of assisting the governing body of a nonpublic school in developing its core academic curriculum.
(8) Excluding special education pupils, pupils having a learning disability, and pupils with extenuating circumstances as determined by school officials, a pupil who does not score satisfactorily on the fourth or seventh grade state assessment program reading test shall be provided special assistance reasonably expected to enable the pupil to bring his or her reading skills to grade level within 12 months.
(9) Any course that would have been considered a nonessential elective course under Snyder v Charlotte School Dist, 421 Mich 517 (1984), on April 13, 1990 shall continue to be offered to resident pupils of nonpublic schools on a shared time basis.
(10) As used in this section, “Armenian Genocide”, “genocide”, and “Holocaust” mean those terms as defined in section 1168.

Sec. 1279g.
(1) The board of a school district or board of directors of a public school academy shall comply with this section and shall administer the Michigan merit examination to pupils in grade 11, and to pupils in grade 12 who did not take the complete Michigan merit examination in grade 11, as provided in this section.
(2) For the purposes of this section, the department of technology, management, and budget shall contract with 1 or more providers to develop, supply, and score the Michigan merit examination. The Michigan merit examination shall consist of all of the following:
(a) Assessment instruments that measure English language arts, mathematics, reading, and science and are used by colleges and universities in this state for entrance or placement purposes. This shall include a writing component in which the pupil produces an extended writing sample. The Michigan merit examination shall not require any other extended writing sample.
(b) One or more tests from 1 or more test developers that assess a pupil’s ability to apply at least reading and mathematics skills in a manner that is intended to allow employers to use the results in making employment decisions. The department of technology, management, and budget and the superintendent of public instruction shall ensure that any test or tests selected under this subdivision have all the components necessary to allow a pupil to be eligible to receive the results of a nationally recognized evaluation of workforce readiness if the pupil’s test performance is adequate.
(c) A social studies component.
(d) Any other component that is necessary to obtain the approval of the United States Department of Education to use the Michigan merit examination for the purposes of the no child left behind act of 2001, Public Law 107-110, or the every student succeeds act, Public Law 114-95.
(3) In addition to all other requirements of this section, all of the following apply to the Michigan merit examination:
(a) The department of technology, management, and budget and the superintendent of public instruction shall ensure that any contractor used for scoring the Michigan merit examination supplies an individual report for each pupil that will identify for the pupil’s parents and teachers whether the pupil met expectations or failed to meet expectations for each standard, to allow the pupil’s parents and teachers to assess and remedy problems before the pupil moves to the next grade.
(b) The department of technology, management, and budget and the superintendent of public instruction shall ensure that any contractor used for scoring, developing, or processing the Michigan merit examination meets quality management standards commonly used in the assessment industry, including at least meeting level 2 of the capability maturity model developed by the Software Engineering Institute of Carnegie Mellon University for the first year the
Michigan merit examination is offered to all grade 11 pupils and at least meeting level 3 of the capability maturity model for subsequent years.
(c) The department of technology, management, and budget and the superintendent of public instruction shall ensure that any contract for scoring, administering, or developing the Michigan merit examination includes specific deadlines for all steps of the assessment process, including, but not limited to, deadlines for the correct testing materials to be supplied to schools and for the correct results to be returned to schools, and includes penalties for noncompliance with these deadlines.
(d) The superintendent of public instruction shall ensure that the Michigan merit examination meets all of the following:
(i) Is designed to test pupils on grade level content expectations or course content expectations, as appropriate, in all subjects tested.
(ii) Complies with requirements of the no child left behind act of 2001, Public Law 107-110, or the every student
(iii) Is consistent with the code of fair testing practices in education prepared by the joint committee on testing practices of the American Psychological Association.
(iv) Is factually accurate. If the superintendent of public instruction determines that a question is not factually accurate and should be excluded from scoring, the state board and the superintendent of public instruction shall ensure that the question is excluded from scoring.
(4) A school district or public school academy that operates a high school shall include on each pupil’s high school transcript all of the following:
(a) For each high school graduate who has completed the Michigan merit examination under this section, the pupil’s scaled score on each subject area component of the Michigan merit examination.
(b) The number of school days the pupil was in attendance at school each school year during high school and the total number of school days in session for each of those school years.
(5) The superintendent of public instruction shall work with the provider or providers of the Michigan merit examination to produce Michigan merit examination subject area scores for each pupil participating in the Michigan merit examination, including scaling and merging of test items for the different subject area components. The superintendent of public instruction shall design and distribute to school districts, public school academies, intermediate school districts, and nonpublic schools a simple and concise document that describes the scoring for each subject area
and indicates the scaled score ranges for each subject area.
(6) The Michigan merit examination shall be administered each year after March 1 and before June 1 to pupils in grade 11. The superintendent of public instruction shall ensure that the Michigan merit examination is scored and the scores are returned to pupils, their parents or legal guardians, and schools not later than the beginning of the pupil’s first semester of grade 12. The returned scores shall indicate at least the pupil’s scaled score for each subject area component and the range of scaled scores for each subject area. In reporting the scores to pupils, parents, and schools, the superintendent of public instruction shall provide standards-specific, meaningful, and timely feedback on the pupil’s performance on the Michigan merit examination.
(7) A school district or public school academy shall administer the complete Michigan merit examination to a pupil only once and shall not administer the complete Michigan merit examination to the same pupil more than once. If a pupil does not take the complete Michigan merit examination in grade 11, the school district or public school academy shall administer the complete Michigan merit examination to the pupil in grade 12. If a pupil chooses to retake the college entrance examination component of the Michigan merit examination, as described in subsection (2)(a), the pupil may do so through the provider of the college entrance examination component and the cost of the retake is the responsibility of the pupil unless all of the following are met:
(a) The pupil has taken the complete Michigan merit examination.
(b) The pupil meets the income eligibility criteria for free breakfast, lunch, or milk, as determined under the Richard B. Russell national school lunch act, 42 USC 1751 to 1769j.
(c) The pupil has applied to the provider of the college entrance examination component for a scholarship or fee waiver to cover the cost of the retake and that application has been denied.
(d) After taking the complete Michigan merit examination, the pupil has not already received a free retake of the college entrance examination component paid for either by this state or through a scholarship or fee waiver by the provider.
(8) The superintendent of public instruction shall ensure that the length of the Michigan merit examination and the combined total time necessary to administer all of the components of the Michigan merit examination are the shortest possible that will still maintain the degree of reliability and validity of the Michigan merit examination results determined necessary by the superintendent of public instruction. The superintendent of public instruction shall ensure that the maximum total combined length of time that schools are required to set aside for pupils to answer all test questions on
the Michigan merit examination does not exceed 8 hours if the superintendent of public instruction determines that sufficient alignment to applicable Michigan merit curriculum content standards can be achieved within that time limit.
(9) A school district or public school academy shall provide accommodations to a pupil with disabilities for the Michigan merit examination, as provided under section 504 of title V of the rehabilitation act of 1973, 29 USC 794; subtitle A of title II of the Americans with disabilities act of 1990, 42 USC 12131 to 12134; the individuals with disabilities education act amendments of 1997, Public Law 105-17; and the implementing regulations for those statutes.
The provider or providers of the Michigan merit examination and the superintendent of public instruction shall mutually agree upon the accommodations to be provided under this subsection.
(10) To the greatest extent possible, the Michigan merit examination shall be based on grade level content expectations or course content expectations, as appropriate. Not later than July 1, 2008, the department shall identify specific grade level content expectations to be taught before and after the middle of grade 11, so that teachers will know what content will be covered within the Michigan merit examination.
(11) A child who is a student in a nonpublic school or home school may take the Michigan merit examination under this section. To take the Michigan merit examination, a child who is a student in a home school shall contact the school district in which the child resides, and that school district shall administer the Michigan merit examination, or the child may take the Michigan merit examination at a nonpublic school if allowed by the nonpublic school. Upon request from a nonpublic school, the superintendent of public instruction shall direct the provider or providers to supply the Michigan merit examination to the nonpublic school and the nonpublic school may administer the Michigan merit examination. If a school district administers the Michigan merit examination under this subsection to a child who is not enrolled in the school district, the scores for that child are not considered for any purpose to be scores of a pupil of the school district.

(12) In contracting under subsection (2), the department of technology, management, and budget shall consider a contractor that provides electronically-scored essays with the ability to score constructed response feedback in multiple languages and provide ongoing instruction and feedback.
(13) The purpose of the Michigan merit examination is to assess pupil performance in mathematics, science, social studies, and English language arts for the purpose of improving academic achievement and establishing a statewide standard of competency. The assessment under this section provides a common measure of data that will contribute to the improvement of Michigan schools’ curriculum and instruction by encouraging alignment with Michigan’s curriculum
framework standards and promotes pupil participation in higher level mathematics, science, social studies, and English language arts courses. These standards are based upon the expectations of what pupils should learn through high school and are aligned with national standards.
(14) In addition to the other requirements of this section and the requirements of 1970 PA 38, MCL 388.1081 to 388.1086, beginning with assessments conducted during the 2016-2017 school year, the superintendent of public instruction shall ensure that the Michigan merit examination social studies component and the M-STEP and any successor state assessment for social studies, as appropriate, include questions related to the learning objectives in the state board recommended model core academic curriculum standards concerning genocide, including, but not limited to, the Holocaust and the Armenian Genocide.
(15) As used in this section:
(a) “Armenian Genocide”, “genocide”, and “Holocaust” mean those terms as defined in section 1168.
(b) “English language arts” means reading and writing.
(c) “Social studies” means United States history, world history, world geography, economics, and American government.
This act is ordered to take immediate effect.

House Resolution No. 65.
State of Michigan
2017

Reps. Kesto, Chang, Chirkun, Cochran, Crawford, Faris, Frederick, Geiss, Greig, Hoadley, Howrylak, Hughes, Jones, Kelly, Lasinski, Marino, Moss, Sabo, Singh, Webber and Wittenberg offered the following resolution:

A resolution to declare April 24, 2017, as a Day of Remembrance in the state of Michigan for the Armenian Genocide of 1915-1923.

Whereas, Michigan Armenian churches have been involved in numerous charity and community drives across the state, including, but not limited to, providing college scholarships for deserving students and serving Armenian refugee communities across the state; and

Whereas, Between 1915-1923, Armenians were subject to torture, starvation, mass murder, and exile from their historic homeland. Over 1.5 million Armenians lost their lives. The bulk of the Armenian population was displaced from their homes and forced to escape to neighboring and far away communities. Many refugees fled to the United States. Today, Michigan is honored to be home to a vibrant Armenian-American population. This thriving community is a proud reminder of the survival and determination even in the face of extreme injustices. The Armenian Genocide represented a deliberate attempt by the Ottoman Empire to eliminate all traces of a thriving, noble civilization; and

Whereas, Armenian communities all over the world commemorate this tragedy on April 24. On this day, we honor the victims and survivors of the genocide and reaffirm our commitment to preventing future atrocities from being committed against any people; now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives, That the members of this legislative body declare April 24, 2017, as a Day of Remembrance in the state of Michigan for the Armenian Genocide of 1915-1923.

Michigan Public Acts

Act No. 558
State of Michigan
August 28, 2002

Public Acts of 2002

Approved by the Governor

August 27, 2002

Filed with the Secretary of State
August 28, 2002

EFFECTIVE DATE: August 28, 2002

STATE OF MICHIGAN

91ST LEGISLATURE

REGULAR SESSION OF 2002

Introduced by Senators McCotter, Hart, Dingell, Bullard, Bennett, Schuette, Peters, Leland, Hoffman, Gougeon, Goschka, Sikkema, Shugars, Dunaskiss, Johnson, North, Hammerstrom, Stille, McManus, Smith, DeBeaussaert, Garcia, Murphy, Miller, Van Regenmorter, Sanborn, Steil, Schwarz, Young, Scott and Byrum

ENROLLED SENATE BILL No. 395

AN ACT to establish the Michigan days of remembrance of the Armenian genocide.

The People of the State of Michigan enact:

Sec. 1. The legislature declares that April 24 of each year shall be the Michigan day of remembrance of the Armenian genocide of 1915-1923, and that the period beginning on the Sunday before that day through the following Sunday shall be the days of remembrance in this state, in memory of the victims of the genocide, and in honor of the survivors.

This act is ordered to take immediate effect.
Secretary of the Senate.
Clerk of the House of Representatives.

Approved

Governor.

Michigan Municipal

PROCLAMATION BY THE TROY CITY COUNCIL
TROY CITY, Michigan
APRIL 20, 2015

WHEREAS, On the night of April 24, 1915, more than 200 leaders in the Armenian community, in the city known today as Istanbul, were arrested. Sent to prison, most were executed, beginning a horrible, systemic killing and forced relocation of the Armenian people that would last until 1923; and

WHEREAS, During those years, the government of the Ottoman Empire claimed the lives of 1.5 million Armenians and forced 500,000 more from their homeland. The Armenian Genocide was a terrible breach of human rights and an event that has outraged the world; and

WHEREAS, The atrocities carried out against the Armenian people were grave and unimaginable, as they were subjected to deportation, abduction, torture, starvation, and more. And as with any violent conflict, Armenian women and children suffered the worst abuses. The bulk of the Armenian population that was displaced from their homes was forced to escape to neighboring as well as faraway countries.  Many fled to the United States; and

WHEREAS, The United States is honored to be a home to a vibrant growing Armenian- American population. This thriving community, many living in the City of Troy, are a proud reminder of survival and determination even in the face of extreme injustice; and

WHEREAS, As Americans, it is our duty to raise awareness of the Armenian Genocide and to participate in the remembrance and mourning of the loss of innocent lives a century ago;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, That the Troy City Council proclaims April 19-26, 2015, as “Days of Remembrance of the Armenian Genocide”; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, That the Troy City Council encourages all residents to raise awareness about the Armenian Genocide and attend commemoration events honoring the memory of innocent victims on this 100th anniversary.

Presented this 20th day of April 2015.

MISCELLANEOUS RESOLUTION
April 26, 2017
STATE OF MICHIGAN, COUNTY OF OAKLAND

BY: Commissioner Shelley Taub, District #12; Bill Dwyer, District #14; Nancy Quarles, District #17; Wade Fleming, District #16; Hugh Crawford, District #9; and Marcia Gershenson, District #13

IN RE: BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS – DESIGNATION OF APRIL 24, 2017 AS ARMENIAN MARTYRS’ DAY IN OAKLAND COUNTY

To the Oakland County Board of Commissioners Chairperson, Ladies and Gentlemen:

WHEREAS in 1915, the leaders of the Young Turk Party of the Ottoman Empire undertook a brutal, genocidal campaign of hatred against the people of Armenian descent; and

WHEREAS leaders of the Armenian people, including writers, thinkers, and professionals were rounded up, deported, and killed in Constantinople or present-day Istanbul, Turkey; and

WHEREAS the horrific events that followed have been recognized by scholars, governments, and civil society all over the world as the Armenian Genocide of World War I, when from 1915 through 1923, the Young Turk leadership of the Ottoman Empire orchestrated the persecution and death of approximately 1.5 million of the 2.5 million Armenians then living in Anatolia or present-day Turkey; and

WHEREAS this tragedy must be recognize as an attempted genocide of the Armenian people that inspired the horrific acts of others; and

WHEREAS the survivors of this massacre were forced from their homeland and scattered around the world; and

WHEREAS more than 11,000 people of Armenian descent reside in Southeast Michigan and many call Oakland County home; and

WHEREAS included among these many Armenian citizens are refugees, direct descendants and relatives whose lives were touched by the genocide; and

WHEREAS April 24, 2017 has been designated by community and religious leaders as Armenian Martyr’s Day, a day of Memorial observance, and

WHEREAS even as we confront the inhumanity of 1915, we also are inspired by the remarkable spirit, strength, tenacity and courage of the Armenian people and their contributions which have enriched our communities , spurred our economy, and strengthened our democracy; and

WHEREAS the Oakland County Board of Commissioners desires to join in this observance to commemorate the victims of these crimes against humanity and express our desire that these horrors are never forgotten.

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Oakland County Board of Commissioners does hereby declare April 24, 2017, and each subsequent anniversary, in perpetuity, to be Armenian Martyrs’ Day in Oakland County.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Oakland County Clerk is requested to forward copies of this adopted resolution to the Armenian Embassy in Washington, DC, St. John’s Armenian Church of Southfield and the Armenian National Committee.
Chairperson, I move the adoption of the foregoing resolution.

Resolution #17064                                                        March 15, 2017

The Chairperson referred the resolution to the General Government Committee. There were no objections.

Resolution #17064                                                          April 26, 2017

Moved by Berman supported by Bowman the resolutions (with fiscal notes attached)  on  the  Consent

Agenda  be adopted (with accompanying  reports being accepted).

AYES: Crawford, Dwyer, Fleming, Gershenson, Hoffman, Jackson, Kochenderfer, Kowall, Long, McGillivray,  Middleton,  Quarles,  Spisz,  Taub,  Tietz,  Weipert,  Zack,  Berman,  Bowman.   (19) NAYS:   None. (0)

A sufficient majority having voted in favor, the resolutions (with fiscal notes  attached)  on the Consent Agenda  were adopted (with accompanying  reports  being accepted).

I, Lisa Brown, Clerk of the County of Oakland, do hereby certify that the foregoing resolution is a true and accurate copy of a resolution adopted by the Oakland County Board of Commissioners  on April 26, 2017, with the original record  thereof now remaining  in my office.

In Testimony Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the seal of the County of Oakland  at  Pontiac,  Michigan this 26th  day of April, 2017.

MISCELLANEOUS RESOLUTION #18077
County of Oakland, State of Michigan
March 8, 2018

BY: Commissioners Shelley Taub, District #12; Marcia Gershenson, District #13, Eileen Kowall, District #6; Hugh Crawford, District #9; Thomas Middleton, District #4; and Janet Jackson, District #21

IN RE: BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS – DESIGNATION OF APRIL 24, 2018 AS ARMENIAN MARTYRS’ DAY IN OAKLAND COUNTY

To the Oakland County Board of Commissioners

Chairperson, Ladies and Gentlemen:

WHEREAS in 1915, the leaders of the Young Turk Party of the Ottoman Empire undertook a brutal, genocidal campaign of hatred against the people of Armenian descent; and

WHEREAS leaders of the Armenian people, including writers, thinkers, and professionals were rounded up, deported, and killed in Constantinople or present-day Istanbul, Turkey; and

WHEREAS the horrific events that followed have been recognized by scholars, governments, and civil society all over the world as the Armenian Genocide of World War I, when from 1915 through 1923, the Young Turk leadership of the Ottoman Empire orchestrated the persecution and death of approximately 1.5 million of the 2.5 million Armenians then living in Anatolia or present-day Turkey; and

WHEREAS this tragedy must be recognized as an attempted genocide of the Armenian people that inspired the horrific acts of others; and

WHEREAS the survivors of this massacre were forced from their homeland and scattered around the world; and

WHEREAS more than 11,000 people of Armenian descent reside in Southeast Michigan and many call Oakland County home; and

WHEREAS included among these many Armenian citizens are refugees, direct descendants and relatives whose lives were touched by the genocide; and

WHEREAS April 24, 2018 has been designated by community and religious leaders as Armenian Martyr’s Day, a day of Memorial observance; and

WHEREAS even as we confront the inhumanity of 1915, we also are inspired by the remarkable spirit, strength, tenacity and courage of the Armenian people and their contributions which have enriched our communities, spurred our economy, and strengthened our democracy; and

WHEREAS the Oakland County Board of Commissioners desires to join in this observance to commemorate the victims of these crimes against humanity and express our desire that these horrors are never forgotten.

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Oakland County Board of Commissioners does hereby declare April 24, 2018, and each subsequent anniversary, in perpetuity, to be Armenian Martyrs’ Day in Oakland County.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Oakland County Clerk/Register of Deeds is requested to forward copies of this adopted resolution to the Armenian Embassy in Washington, DC, St. John’s Armenian Church of Southfield and the Armenian National Committee.

Chairperson, I move the adoption of the foregoing resolution.

(SIGNATURES)

Resolution #18077                                                                                                                                                 March 8, 2018

Moved by Taub supported by Woodward to suspend the rules and vote on Miscellaneous Resolution #18077 — Board of Commissioners – Designation of April 24, 2018 as Armenian Martyrs’ Day in Oakland County

Vote on motion to suspend the rules:

AYES: Spisz, Taub, Weipert, Woodward, Zack, Berman, Bowman, Crawford, Dwyer, Fleming, Gershenson, Gingell, Hoffman, Jackson, Kochenderfer, Kowall, Long, McGillivray Middleton, Quarles. (20)

NAYS: None. (0)

A sufficient majority having voted in favor, the motion to suspend the rules and vote on Miscellaneous Resolution #18077 Board of Commissioners – Designation of April 24, 2018 as Armenian Martyrs’ Day in Oakland County carried.

Moved by Taub supported by Woodward the resolution be adopted.

AYES: Taub, Weipert, Woodward, Zack, Berman, Bowman, Crawford, Dwyer, Fleming, Gershenson, Gingell, Hoffman, Jackson, Kochenderfer Kowall, Long McGillivray, Middleton Quarles, Spisz. (20)

NAYS: None. (0)

A sufficient majority having voted in favor, the resolution was adopted.

(SIGNED)

I HEREBY APPROVE THIS RESOLUTION CHIEF DEPUTY COUNTY EXECUTIVE ACTING PURSUANT TO  MCL 45.559A (7)

(STATE OF MICHIGAN)

(COUNTY OF OAKLAND)

I, Lisa Brown, Clerk of the County of Oakland, do hereby certify that the foregoing resolution is a true and accurate copy of a resolution adopted by the Oakland County Board of Commissioners on March 8, 2018, with the original record thereof now remaining in my office.

In Testimony Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the seal of the County of Oakland at Pontiac, Michigan this 8th day of March, 2018.

(SIGNED)

Lisa Brown, Oakland County

Michigan Support for Survivors of the Armenian Genocide

Michigan was a staunch supporter of Near East Relief (NER), the American-led campaign that quickly sparked an international response with its unprecedented humanitarian endeavor, mobilizing all segments of American citizenry including elected officials, celebrities and laypersons alike, to help rescue victims of the Armenian Genocide in Ottoman Turkey from 1915-1930.

Michigan facilitated its relief efforts from its NER state headquarters located at 1106 Stroh Building in Detroit.

Mrs. E.L. Calkins of Michigan, a member of the State Committee, and the President of The Woman’s Christian Temperance Union, assisted NER’s collection drives for foodstuffs, most especially through collecting bags of flour, which was essential for preparing meals throughout the over 400 NER orphanages, hospitals, medical clinics and schools.

Read the complete fact sheet prepared by America We Thank You.

Armenian Genocide in Michigan Press